We imagine a time when cancer is no longer the leading cause of death for people under age 85. We envision a time when cancer is eradicated altogether. Thanks to research, many forms of cancer are now prevented entirely or diagnosed in their earliest, most treatable stages. Thanks to research, new treatments and interventions exist for advanced cancers.

By funding efforts to better understand the beginnings of cancer and more effectively treat cancer, you help relieve suffering and improve the quality of life for cancer patients, survivors, and their families when you give.

Recent News

Letter of Hope from the Zangle Lab

Just a little way down the hill from Huntsman Cancer Institute, the Zangle Lab in the Department of Chemical Engineering is working on new technologies to choose the most effective therapies for each individual patient with breast cancer. We are excited about a project that takes a new approach to measure the growth of cancer cells and predict which drugs may be most beneficial to patients with advanced metastatic breast cancer.

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Breaking The Link Between Obesity and Gastrointestinal Cancers

By unraveling the link between obesity and gastrointestinal cancers, researchers hope to develop effective treatments and strategies for lowering cancer risk. A team of scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute published a wide review of findings on the biological links between obesity and gastrointestinal cancers. They also examined studies on how diet, exercise, and other weight-related interventions may help reverse this connection.

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Study Reveals Reasons Why African American Men Are Underrepresented in Prostate Cancer Research

African American men experience significant health disparities. They are almost twice as likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer as white men, yet they are underrepresented in prostate cancer research. A new study by Charles R. Rogers, PhD, MPH, MS, CHESĀ®, uncovers attitudes toward prostate cancer research among African American men and suggests strategies to increase participation in research. The study is included in a new collection of research on health disparities impacting African American men.

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