Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) is a leader in the study of cancer genetics and its researchers have discovered more inherited cancer genes than any other cancer center in the world. Genes responsible for breast and ovarian cancer, colon cancer, head and neck cancer, and melanoma were identified here.

From its beginning, HCI has followed a “lab bench to patient bedside” research model. HCI is the only cancer center in the region that conducts basic, translational, and clinical research simultaneously, taking what’s learned in the laboratory through drug development and into the clinic.

Recent News

Press Releases, In The Media

Huntsman Cancer Institute Partners with National Cancer Institute on National Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Education Initiative

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah is partnering with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to implement a nationwide colorectal cancer outreach and education initiative in support of increasing colorectal cancer screening rates in rural, frontier, and culturally diverse communities in Utah. The Screen to Save Initiative will launch in March at HCI and 48 other cancer centers around the nation, targeting average risk adults age 50 and older.

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News, In The Media

Actors Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen Visit Huntsman Cancer Institute Patients and Staff

Actors Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen spent two hours visiting patients at Huntsman Cancer Institute on Sunday, January 22. The “Avengers: Age of Ultron” and “Captain America: Civil War” co-stars were in town promoting their Sundance film “Wind River.” Before flying back to Los Angeles, they took time to stop by the hospital and talk with cancer patients and staff.

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Press Releases, In The Media

Huntsman Cancer Institute Scientists Identify Bone Degradation Process Within Metastatic Breast Cancer

Once breast cancer spreads through the body, it can degrade a patient’s healthy bones, causing numerous problems. Scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah have identified a new way that bones get destroyed through cancer. And they’ve also learned how to block that destruction with a new drug. Initial tests with patients show promising results.

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