Chemoprevention for People at High Risk
In The Media, HCI News

Chemoprevention for People at High Risk

Individuals with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) have a nearly 100 percent chance of developing colon cancer and often undergo surgery to remove the colon so cancer can’t develop there. A new medication being tested in a clinical trial lead by Jewel Samadder, MD, has shown promising results. The first round of testing shows that in less than six months, half of the patients who received medication saw a nearly 70% regression of polyps. For some, polyps disappeared completely....

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Why Do Elephants Almost Never Get Cancer?
In The Media, HCI News

Why Do Elephants Almost Never Get Cancer?

P53 – one gene that may hold the key. Humans have two copies, but some people are missing a copy. For individuals with only one working copy of P53, their lifetime risk of cancer is nearly 100 percent. Elephants, after 55 million years of evolution, have 40 copies of the P53 gene. Those extra copies protect elephant’s cells from cancer by eliminating cells that develops any type of mutation that could go on to become cancer....

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In The Media

NantHealth and University of Utah Establish Heritage 1K Project to Discover Genetic Causes of 25 Rare and Common Diseases

NantHealth, Inc., (Nasdaq: NH), a leading next-generation, evidence-based, personalized healthcare company, today announced that it has partnered with the University of Utah in analyzing the entire genomic profiles of at least 1,000 individuals who have a history of rare and life-threatening diseases and conditions in their respective families. The landmark project will focus on researching the genetic causes of 25 conditions, including, breast, colon, ovarian, and prostate cancers, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), chronic lymphocytic leukemia, autism, preterm birth, epilepsy, and other hereditary conditions. Genomic sequencing will be conducted with unique, comprehensive molecular tests offered by NantHealth. NantHealth’s genomic sequencing platform integrates whole genome (DNA) sequencing, and RNA sequencing. By carrying out this extensive testing, including analysis of germline and somatic samples, University of Utah and NantOmics researchers will be able to explore the underlying genetic causes of certain conditions and diseases at the cellular level....

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In The Media

Hope for a cancer-free future: chemoprevention for people at high risk

Kathy and her niece, Rhonda, regularly make the trip from their small town in Illinois, to Salt Lake City. They don’t come to see family and friends or to cheer for the University of Utah. They come to Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) to be tested for polyps in their small intestines. Kathy and Rhonda both have familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), an inherited genetic disease. FAP causes hundreds of polyps to form throughout the small and large intestines. Any polyp in the intestine has the potential to become cancer. With so many polyps, people with FAP have a nearly 100-percent chance of developing colon cancer. Patients with FAP often undergo surgery to remove the colon so cancer can’t develop there....

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Madison Memorial teams up with Huntsman Cancer Institute on clinic
In The Media

Madison Memorial teams up with Huntsman Cancer Institute on clinic

Madison Memorial Hospital and the the Huntsman Cancer Institute have teamed up to better provide cancer patients with convenient and closer services. The goal of the project is to give local patients an easier commute, instead of traveling miles out of town for cancer services. CEO of Madison Memorial Hospital Rachel Gonzales said the last thing you want to do when your sick is think about the burden of traveling far. "You're not feeling well, you're stress you're afraid. You just received the scariest diagnosis of your life. And you're having to travel and leave your family often. So that travel time just adds more stress," Gonzales said. After all, the treatment requires temporarily increasing levels of certain sex hormones to five or 10 times the normal. Two of those hormones, estrogen and progesterone, can affect the course of certain kinds of breast cancer....

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In The Media

Physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia: increasingly legal but still rare

Legalized euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are mainly used by patients with cancer, but remain rare, according to a new analysis of such programs. In the last year alone, California has legalized physician-assisted suicide, Canada legalized both physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia, and Colombia performed its first legal euthanasia, said John Urwin, a study author from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. "In order to inform current debates, it's imperative to understand current laws and practices."...

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In The Media

Cases of Aggressive Prostate Cancer on the Rise, Research Finds

Cases of aggressive prostate cancer appear to be on the rise, researchers reported Tuesday. The good news is it's still rare for prostate cancer to spread. Just 3 percent of cases have already started spreading when men are diagnosed and prostate cancer overall has not become more common, the team found. And the American Cancer Society strongly questioned the findings and the methods used to get them....

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In The Media

I.V.F. Does Not Raise Breast Cancer Risk, Study Shows

Women undergoing in vitro fertilization have long worried that the procedure could raise their risk for breast cancer. After all, the treatment requires temporarily increasing levels of certain sex hormones to five or 10 times the normal. Two of those hormones, estrogen and progesterone, can affect the course of certain kinds of breast cancer....

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Toward True Health: Fight cancer with good nutrition
In The Media

Toward True Health: Fight cancer with good nutrition

Question: With so many people affected by cancer, why is there so little information about the role of nutrition in cancer care? Sugar specifically? Answer: “It puzzles me why the simple concept ‘sugar feeds cancer’ can be so dramatically overlooked as part of a comprehensive cancer treatment plan” writes registered dietician Patrick Quillin, former director of nutrition for Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Tulsa, Okla. (Nutrition Science News, April 2000)....

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Navigating Through Cancer
HCI News

Navigating Through Cancer

Eduardo Ayala was 17 years old when he was diagnosed with testicular cancer. He is fluent in English and Spanish, but his parents speak only Spanish. Eduardo and his family came to HCI from Nevada for his treatments. It is one of the five Mountain West states at the core of HCI’s service area. Cancer has a language all its own and it’s that much harder if English is not your first language. That’s where Guadalupe Tovar, a health educator and patient navigator at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI), comes in. She helps Hispanic families navigate their cancer care....

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In The Media

Researchers identify new drug target for treating children with CNS-PNET

Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) are the largest group of malignant brain tumors in children. They can arise from the brain's cerebellum or, more rarely, from tissue located throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Little is known about how CNS-PNETs develop, although these tumors are more aggressive than other PNETs and have an overall survival rate of only about 20 percent. In a new study, researchers for the first time have identified a possible target for a new CNS-PNET therapy....

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In The Media

First Drug Target Identified for Children with Rare Type of Brain Tumor

Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) are the largest group of malignant brain tumors in children. They can arise from the brain's cerebellum or, more rarely, from tissue located throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Little is known about how CNS-PNETs develop, although these tumors are more aggressive than other PNETs and have an overall survival rate of only about 20 percent. In a new study, researchers for the first time have identified a possible target for a new CNS-PNET therapy....

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Huntsman Cancer Institute Investigator Receives Leadership Award from the National Cancer Institute
News

Huntsman Cancer Institute Investigator Receives Leadership Award from the National Cancer Institute

The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Awards recognize and support outstanding clinical investigators at NCI-Designated Cancer Centers who participate extensively in NCI- funded collaborative clinical trials and whose leadership, participation, and activities promote a culture of successful clinical research. Established in 2009, the awards are intended to help retain investigators in academic clinical research careers. This year, 13 investigators nationwide, including Theresa Werner, MD, Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) investigator and University of Utah assistant professor of medicine have received the award....

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In The Media

Drug Combo Reduces Duodenal Polyp Development

Treatment with a two-drug therapy of sulindac and erlotinib reduces the development of precancerous duodenal polyps in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), according to a new study presented at the 2016 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and published in Journal of the American Medical Association...

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"The Generation to End Cancer" - the Sigma Chi 20k Club
HCI News

"The Generation to End Cancer" - the Sigma Chi 20k Club

They call themselves “The Generation to End Cancer.” Sigma Chi fraternity brothers from across the United States sharing one goal – to raise $10 million for cancer research at HCI. For many Sigma Chi brothers, this fight against cancer is personal. Dan Shaver, chairman of the Sigma Chi Philanthropy Committee says, ,”We rarely come across someone whose family isn’t directly or indirectly affected by cancer. I just don’t think we’ll ever rest until we find the cure.” Sigma Chi fraternities raised $1.3 million during the 2015-2016 school year. 29 schools each raised more than $20 thousand dollars and traveled to Salt Lake to be inducted into the 20k club....

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Ovarian Cancer Symptoms and Treatments
In The Media

Ovarian Cancer Symptoms and Treatments

Ovarian cancer accounts for about three percent of cancers among women, but it causes more deaths than any other cancer of the female reproductive system - like uterine, cervix, Fallopian tube, vulvar and vaginal cancer The reason for this is ovarian cancer is almost always detected at advanced stages (meaning the tumor has typically spread by the time it is diagnosed). Due to this, it is very difficult to cure ovarian cancer....

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Join Mark Koelbel and Timp Harley for the 2016 Ride For Life
In The Media

Join Mark Koelbel and Timp Harley for the 2016 Ride For Life

Salt Lake City — (KUTV) The 2016 Ride for Life is scheduled for Saturday July 9th and proceeds will benefit the Huntsman Cancer Institute. Tickets can be purchased at the Timpanogas Harley Davidson store in Lindon. The ride will start there and then end at the USANA Ampitheater....

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HCI Convenes Cancer Moonshot Summit
In The Media

HCI Convenes Cancer Moonshot Summit

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah participated in a national summit on the Cancer Moonshot initiative on June 29, 2016. The Cancer Moonshot Summits were organized at the request of Vice President Joe Biden, and more than 270 organizations hosted summits that brought together patients and survivors, researchers, physicians, advocates, philanthropists, and data and technology experts to brainstorm ways of speeding up progress in cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care over the next five years—and to ultimately end cancer as we know it....

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New trial gives hope to terminal cancer patients
In The Media

New trial gives hope to terminal cancer patients

Breast cancer is far too common. In fact, one in eight women will be diagnosed with the disease in her lifetime. Many will be treated with chemotherapy and radiation, giving them a strong chance of survival, but about 30%, more than 75,000 each year, will face a metastasized cancer that isn't curable....

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