Does this look strange to you? Spotting suspicious moles with crowd sourcing
In The Media

Does this look strange to you? Spotting suspicious moles with crowd sourcing

Have you ever been convinced to do something by a friend or family member? Maybe it was buying a new car, starting a new exercise routine, or just trying a new dish at a restaurant. Sometimes people need encouragement from a friend or family member to take action, especially when it comes to taking care of their health. A crowd-sourcing application from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) counts on the power of many to encourage people to have suspicious moles checked out for skin cancer....

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In The Media

Sisters diagnosed weeks apart fight breast cancer together

Two Utah sisters grew up in the same bedroom, went to the same college, worked for almost a decade at the same company and have visited over 50 countries side by side. Now every three weeks, they sit together in matching chairs and chat as their bodies are pumped full of chemotherapy drugs....

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Personal Optimism with Exercise Recovery (POWER) at HCI
HCI News

Personal Optimism with Exercise Recovery (POWER) at HCI

When dealing with cancer treatments and side effects, exercising usually isn’t at the top of a patient’s to-do list. One program at HCI is helping patients understand the importance of physical fitness: Personal Optimism with Exercise Recovery (POWER). Studies show that exercising during and after treatment reduces recurrence rates and improves overall health and survival. At HCI’s Wellness Center, cancer exercise specialists meet with patients to create exercise prescriptions. This consists of an initial visit to look at things like balance, flexibility, range of motion, and strength. Then the patient is walked through their exercise prescription, including what to do both at the Wellness Center and at home, and can participate in fitness classes based on their abilities. Doctors and exercise specialists at HCI hope to help patients not just get through cancer, but take control of their health for years to come....

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In The Media

A remedy for cancer information overload

Have you ever felt like there is so much material on a subject that you can't understand it, let alone make decisions? There's a name for this feelinginformation overload. People receiving a cancer diagnosis often experience information overload. Donna Branson, director of Patient and Public Education at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI), explains, "If you Google the term breast cancer, you may get 44 million hits. It's confusing, and not all of the information out there is credible."...

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Salt Lake County names diversity affairs director
In The Media

Salt Lake County names diversity affairs director

Emma Houston is the new director of diversity affairs for Salt Lake County. A longtime community volunteer, Houston was been on the county's Council on Diversity Affairs since 2013. She is a former chairwoman of the Governor's Office of Ethnic Affairs along with serving on the boards of the Huntsman Cancer Foundation and the National Council on Aging....

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Feeling Cancer Information Overload? Call or visit our Cancer Learning Center
HCI News

Feeling Cancer Information Overload? Call or visit our Cancer Learning Center

With so much information about cancer that is readily available, those impacted by a cancer diagnosis often experience a feeling of information overload. The Cancer Learning Center (CLC) at HCI provides a welcoming environment where patients, families, and the general public can get answers to their questions about cancer. Trained health educators help visitors and callers navigate the potential for information overload and provide current, accurate information about treatment, side effects, and coping strategies. This resource is free for anyone with questions about cancer. Learn more about the G. Mitchell Morris Cancer Learning Center and how it began in our 2010 Annual Report, and other Education and Outreach programs at HCI....

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Mole Crowdsourcing:  A New Way to Find Deadly Skin Cancer
HCI News

Mole Crowdsourcing: A New Way to Find Deadly Skin Cancer

Melanoma is the most deadly of all skin cancers. If melanoma is found early, it is easier to treat. Researchers at the University of Utah and Texas Tech University have identified a new approach for finding suspicious moles that could be melanoma: mole crowdsourcing. Crowdsourcing refers to using crowds of people, often recruited online, to accomplish tasks. An individual performing a skin self-exam can miss about half of melanomas. But with mole crowdsourcing, one example showed if at least 19 out of 100 people think a mole is suspicious, then a doctor should examine it. Researchers are developing a cell phone application that will allow people to take a photo of a mole and have that image evaluated by other users. Learn more in The Scope Radio podcast about mole crowdsourcing, or about our Melanoma Program and the services it offers to diagnose and treat this disease....

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A seed makes breast cancer surgery easier
In The Media, HCI News

A seed makes breast cancer surgery easier

Alison Elliot, a nurse, knows her health is important. So when her fiftieth birthday rolled around, she scheduled a mammogram. She was called back for a second appointment, where they performed a biopsy on her breast....

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In The Media

Study contradicts belief that cancer protects against Alzheimer’s

Despite studies that claim people with cancer are less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease--raising the possibility that what triggers cancer also prevents the neurodegenerative disorder--a new investigation finds a more somber explanation. Many cancer patients don't live long enough to get Alzheimer's. The research, led by investigators at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, was published in The Journals of Gerontology: Series B. ...

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In The Media

National stereotactic radiosurgery patient registry gains momentum

Brainlab announced that it has enrolled 11 of the expected 30 hospitals and healthcare systems in the national Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) Patient Registry. Launched in partnership with The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) and the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the patient registry will gather important patient data, aiming to define national patterns of care in radiosurgery. The registry will have an eye to improving healthcare outcomes, supporting informed decision-making and potentially lowering the cost of care for patients....

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In The Media

Salt Lake Bees to ‘Pack the Park Pink’ Saturday night

When the Salt Lake Bees take the field on Saturday, May 7 they will be playing for the name on the front and the back of their jersey. The Bees teamed up with Huntsman Cancer Foundation (HCF) to allow donors to pick the names on the back of the on-field jerseys for the team's 10th annual "Pack the Park Pink Night" at Smith's Ballpark on Saturday, May 7....

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 Last performing Ringling Bros. elephants arrive at retirement home
In The Media

Last performing Ringling Bros. elephants arrive at retirement home

Elephants at their new Polk City home The Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus' 11 remaining Asian elephants, after final May 1 performances in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and Providence, R.I., arrived last Thursday at Ringling's Center for Elephant Conservation in Polk City. The elephants joined Ringling's herd of 29 to live out their days....

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Study Contradicts Belief that Cancer Protects against Alzheimer’s
News, Press Releases

Study Contradicts Belief that Cancer Protects against Alzheimer’s

Despite studies that claim people with cancer are less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease—raising the possibility that what triggers cancer also prevents the neurodegenerative disorder—a new investigation finds a more somber explanation. Many cancer patients don’t live long enough to get Alzheimer’s. The research, led by investigators at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, was published in The Journals of Gerontology: Series B....

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Our media relations representatives are here to help reporters Monday-Friday, 7:30 am-5 pm.

Debby Rogers
Public Affairs Manager
Phone: 801-587-7639
debby.rogers@hci.utah.edu

Amie Parker
Public Relations Associate
Phone: 801-213-5755
amie.parker@hci.utah.edu

Jill Woods
Administrative Assistant
Phone: 801-585-5321
Fax: 801-585-0900
jill.woods@hci.utah.edu

After-hours calls: Reporters calling before or after business hours on an urgent matter can page the University of Utah Health on-call media relations representative at 801-581-7387 and press 1.