We imagine a time when cancer is no longer the leading cause of death for people under age 85. We envision a time when cancer is eradicated altogether. Thanks to research, many forms of cancer are now prevented entirely or diagnosed in their earliest, most treatable stages. Thanks to research, new treatments and interventions exist for advanced cancers.

By funding efforts to better understand the beginnings of cancer and more effectively treat cancer, you help relieve suffering and improve the quality of life for cancer patients, survivors, and their families when you give.

Recent News

Patient Stories, Cancer Champions

For Gold Medalist Summer Sanders, Knowledge is Power

Growing up in Roseville, California, Olympic gold medalist Summer Sanders spent every waking hour playing and training outside in the water—usually without sunscreen. “I associated sunscreen with vacation, not training,” Sanders says. Then, in 2014, she was diagnosed with melanoma. No one can say for sure what caused Sanders’ melanoma, but she thinks her frequent exposure to the sun was a contributing factor.

Read More

HCI News

Carson Tahoe Health Opens New Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Care Clinic

Carson City, Nev. – Today, May 15, Carson Tahoe Cancer Center opened a new blood and bone marrow transplant care clinic with support from the Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah. Under the collaboration, a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) physician and nurse from HCI will travel to Carson City once a month to treat patients both before and after they receive a transplant.

Read More

Cancer Champions

The Club You Never Asked to Join: Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer at CancerCon

If you're an adolescent or young adult (AYA) with cancer, it's easy to feel alone. While the number of AYAs with cancer in the United States is not small—70,000 are diagnosed each year—it can feel like you're the only one your age going through this. As the patient navigator for the HI-AYA Cancer Care Program, I recently attended CancerCon, a conference that talks about the challenges of having cancer as an AYA and provides a space for people get to know each other.

Read More