HCI's groundbreaking cancer research occurs in many areas - from the lab bench to the clinic to our community and beyond. Scientists pursuing these bold research ideas are engaged in a lifetime of learning that begins with training as a young student and continues throughout their career. As much as anything, training the next generation of cancer researchers is critical to reducing the heavy burden of a cancer diagnosis.

There are a wide variety of undergraduate, pre- and post-doctoral training opportunities available in the laboratories of Huntsman Cancer Institute members. These training opportunities encompass basic science discovery, clinical investigation and population-based studies. Our goals are to understand cancer from its beginnings, to use this knowledge to create new and better treatments, to implement these strategies to improve outcomes and to learn from our efforts across populations to continually minimize the burdens of cancer.

Trainees flourish in a collaborative and collegial, multidisciplinary research environment under the guidance of experienced mentors. 

Recent News

Press Releases

Huntsman Cancer Institute Announces New Clinical Research Director

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah has announced David Gaffney, MD, PhD, as Senior Director for Clinical Research. In this position, Gaffney oversees HCI’s clinical research efforts which include more than 200 active clinical cancer trials at any given time.

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In The Media

Scientists See Progress for Cancer Vaccines

Tumor-destroying vaccines have emerged as a new weapon in the fight against cancer. Conventional vaccines prevent people from getting sick in the first place. Now scientists are testing a new type of vaccine that treats existing cancers by spurring immune cells to go on the attack. These drugs—known as therapeutic vaccines—hold the potential to plunge cancers into remission without causing the side effects of treatments such as chemotherapy.

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Press Releases, HCI News

Adipose Tissue May Affect Cancer Development in Multiple Ways

Review indicates need to further explore relationship between fat and cancer. Adipose tissue, or fat, may influence the development of cancer in diverse ways, depending on the type of fat and the location in the body, according to results of a systematic review published in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research

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